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Five Ways to Help a Family Living with Alzheimer’s

Five Ways to Help a Family Living with Alzheimer’s

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, 5.7 million people in the United States are living with Alzheimer’s Disease. And there are more than 15 million Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers taking care of them. Odds are that you have someone in your family with the disease, or know someone who does. You may have witnessed or lived with the strain of caring for a person with Alzheimer’s. The disease takes a toll on everyone around them, not just the patient.

Here are five helpful ways you can lend a hand to the person with Alzheimer’s or their caretakers.

  1. Educate yourself about the disease – learn to recognize the signs and stages of the disease. What behavioral changes can you expect over the coming months? How should you address each of these changes? Learn how it affects family members and how to respond. Be patient, as the disease affects patients and families differently.
  2. Offer to help – This can be a simple trip to the grocery store, a warm meal brought to their table, or a car ride to the doctor. Or offer a reprieve. Spend time with the person living with dementia so family members can go out and visit with friends. Taking away just one responsibility will ease the burden on the caregiver.
  3. Engage with the senior– If you visit, don’t ignore them or talk over their heads. Talk directly to them with a smile on your face. Listen patiently as they struggle to find words to reply. Don’t interrupt them while they are speaking, and don’t try to force them to recall events from the past.
  4. Stay in touch – Send a card to the senior, call the caregiver, or stop in for a visit. Extend an invitation for them to join you at a family event or fun excursion. Know their limitations regarding health and stress factors such as noise, and be prepared to alter the plans if necessary.
  5. Offer a shoulder to lean on – Listen to both the senior and the caregiver. You may have heard the story already, but don’t stop them because they don’t remember telling it. Also listen to the caregiver. While you can’t change the situation, just letting them express their challenges and frustrations can relieve some of their stress.

It’s important to remember that the person with Alzheimer’s is the same person they were before the disease. Have the same conversations, enjoy the same activities, and most important, don’t pull away from them. Your friendship and support are appreciated, even if the senior can’t express their emotions.

Source: alz.org

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Home Care Services in Arlington Heights, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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How Walkers Help Seniors Maintain Independence

How Walkers Help Seniors Maintain Independence

While not every senior will need a walker for assistance, those that do are often reluctant to start using one. They see it as a sign of getting too old, sick and frail to maneuver on their own. What they do not see, however, is that a walker can make them more independent. It can help them walk more safely, increase the amount and distance they can walk, and decrease their pain and discomfort while walking. Using a walker can increase self-confidence and improve their health.

Who could benefit from using a walker? Most seniors using walkers have musculo-skeletal (muscle/bone) or neurological health problems. They might have arthritis, mainly in their knees and hips, or a fractured bone, are post-surgical, or are recovering from an illness. Other conditions which may lead to walker use are Osteoporosis, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease, or hemiplegia.

Before purchasing a walker, however, the senior should consult their doctor or a physical therapist for a balance assessment.  There are different types of walkers, each having unique features. A physician can match a walker to the senior’s physical needs.

A standard walker has four straight legs with rubber feet. It requires the user to lift it to move forward. A senior needs good balance to handle a standard walker. For smoother movement, adding wheels to the front legs and glides to the back legs makes it possible to walk without lifting the walker. There are also four-wheeled walkers, or rollators. These often come with fold-down seats and brakes. A triangular design with three legs offers better maneuverability indoors. The best model depends on the senior’s gripping ability, upper and lower body strength, and weight. While wheels help the walker move more smoothly, it also requires greater control so it doesn’t roll ahead of the user. Adjustable walkers are the best option so the senior can adjust its height. A professional should also instruct the senior on the proper way to use the walker.

Once a senior has a walker, their home should be made walker-safe. Pathways should be wide and clear, and area rugs should be removed from floors so the walker doesn’t snag on the edges.

A walker should be regularly checked for wear. Wheels, glides and rubber feet wear out more quickly if used outdoors. Parts are replaceable, though. Before purchasing a walker, check to see if you have to purchase manufacturer parts only, or more readily available universal products.

Once someone has a properly fitted and measured walker, they have a wonderful tool to help prevent falls, increase strength, well-being, and independence.

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Home Care Services in Park Ridge IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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Seven Effective Dementia Communication Techniques

Seven Effective Dementia Communication Techniques

Dementia affects the brain, which in turn changes the way those who are affected by the disorder hear, process, and respond to conversations. As a result, it’s important to adapt your communication habits to techniques they will understand. The easiest way to adapt is nonverbal communication. This includes body language and facial expressions. Here are seven effective dementia communication techniques:

  1. Get the person’s attention. Approach them from the front and address them by name. Introduce yourself and sit down to be at eye level with them. To stay focused, remove yourself from distractions. Put down the phone, shut off the television/radio and close the door from crowds. Move to quieter surroundings if necessary.
  2. Keep patient and calm. Project a positive and calm disposition. Give the person your full attention and do not interrupt them while they are talking. Use facial expressions, tone of voice and physical touch to help convey your message. Match your expressions to your mood.
  3. Speak clearly and slowly. Keep your pitch low and your tone even. Keep your questions easy and try to avoid open-ended questions. Only ask one question at a time. If the person doesn’t answer right away, wait for them to respond. After a few minutes, repeat the question.
  4. Listen Carefully. Don’t interrupt them when they talk. If they struggle for words, make some suggestions. Listen for the meaning and feelings that underlie the words. They may be saying one thing, but feeling another.
  5. Observe their nonverbal reactions. Watch for nonverbal cues that may suggest frustration or impatience, such as a frown or a raised voice. Redirect the conversation if they start to show stress.
  6. Respond with affection and reassurance. People with dementia often get reality confused with imagination and may recall things that never really occurred. Never try to convince them they are wrong. Rather, stay focused on the feelings they are demonstrating and respond with comfort, support, and reassurance. A gentle touch or hug is also reassuring.
  7. Remember the good old days. Remembering the past is soothing and reassuring for patients with dementia. While they can’t recall events that happened 30 minutes ago, they can recall events from 30 years ago. So avoid questions that rely on short term memory. Instead, ask questions that ask about the past.

Even if a loved one has lost most of their verbal skills, remember that people with Alzheimer’s can understand kind touch, laughter and smiles. And never assume that they are completely oblivious to their surroundings. They have good and bad days. Never talk with others about them in their presence.

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Home Care Services in Barrington, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

Sources: DailyCaring.com, Caregiver.org

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Ten Things You Shouldn’t Say to Your Aging Parents

Ten Things You Shouldn’t Say to Your Aging Parents

Yes, we’ve all heard that story about feisty Aunt Mary. Only about 21 times! So what should we say when mom or dad starts to tell the same story for the 22nd time? Simple – just listen.

As our parents start to age, they experience many new happy events, such as the birth of a great-grandchild. But growing older can also bring with it dwindling independence and health. This may cause frustration on their part as they lose control of part of their lives. So how can you help them cope without being disrespectful? Careful dialogue is one of them.

Here are ten things you shouldn’t say to your aging parents.

  1. “You’ve told me this already.” Take advantage of the story to ask questions that might open a new discussion. If mom is telling you about Uncle Bill’s trip to Ireland again, don’t ask her about Uncle Bill’s trip, ask her about her own favorite childhood vacation.
  2. “How did you miss your doctor’s appointment?” Scolding a parent can be demeaning. Rather, talk it through to find out why they missed the appointment to see if the issue can be addressed in the future.
  3. “You’re too old to drive.” Driving is a sign of independence and very hard for someone to relinquish. Approach the issue by saying you’ve noticed a lot of reckless drivers on the road, and you’re afraid something will happen because of another driver’s bad habits.
  4. “I just showed you how to do that yesterday.” Yes, you may have shown them how to use the DVR. But instead of telling them how to do it, write down detailed instructions using illustrations and possibly colored notes or tape on the device.
  5. “You should be using your cane/walker!” This is another protest against aging. The senior sees it as a sign of weakness. Simply tell your parent you are concerned that they might fall, and the consequences could be devastating.
  6. “What has that got to do with what we’re talking about?” Seniors often lose their train of thought and change the topic mid-conversation. You can gently try to bring the talk back to the original topic, or say nothing and just listen.
  7. “I want your china when you die.” Seniors certainly don’t like to be reminded that they will be dying soon. Rather, you can ask if they have stipulated the disbursement of property in their will to make sure their belongings go to the right person.
  8. “You shouldn’t be living alone anymore.” Your parent will see this as giving up their independence. Instead, express your concern that if something should happen to them, like a fall, nobody would be there here to help.
  9. “How can you not remember that?” You just had a conversation with your dad reminding him that the furnace needs repair. When you talk to him the next time, he’s forgotten. Try posting notes around the house as reminders, or make the appointment yourself then call him the morning of the appointment to tell him the repairmen are on their way.
  10. “You never feel good.” Elderly people often start conversations talking about their failing health. Listen patiently, and if it’s something new, suggest a course of action. If you’ve heard the same complaints, listen anyway, then re-direct the conversation when you have a chance.

Compassion goes a long way when dealing with seniors. In addition to failing health and waning independence, their memories are beginning to falter. Put yourself in their shoes and consider your words carefully before speaking.

Dailycaring.com, Nextavenue.com

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Senior Care in DesPlaines, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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Seven Reasons Seniors Need Pets

Seven Reasons Seniors Need Pets

Loneliness is an unwelcome guest in senior households. In many instances, one spouse outlives the other, leaving the surviving spouse in an empty house. All their children have lives of their own, and may even live out of state. Thus, visits are rare. Friends have passed on, and neighbors change over the years.

If the senior is active and able to get out and about, they can participate in social and community events. If they don’t drive, they are housebound, and at the mercy of others to provide rides. They feel like they are imposing on others, so rather than call for a ride, they stay home.

Seniors can become very lonely if they don’t leave their homes. One solution to alleviating their loneliness is to bring a pet into their home. Pets provide a love and companionship that is like no other. Here are seven reasons seniors need pets in their lives.

  • Health Benefits – Pets help reduce stress, lower blood pressure and increase physical activity. While some seniors may not be able to walk a dog outside, they still get exercise when they feed the dog or let them out. Something as simple as getting up out of a chair for a few minutes helps their circulation.
  • Knowledge – When a senior brings a pet into their home, they may want to read up on the breed or the animal. It can stimulate their minds and make them want to read more.
  • Less Worry – Pets live in the here and now. Seniors can learn from them. And who doesn’t smile when puppies wag their tails?
  • 24/7 Availability – Pets never take a day off. They are around morning, noon and night. They don’t go away for holidays or disappear two weeks for vacation. They are built-in companions who will never leave the senior’s side.
  • Purpose in Life – Pets create the need for routine. They need to be fed and toileted and groomed. They give seniors a reason to get up in the morning, even when they are depressed and lonely.
  • New Interests – Having a pet can involve the senior in more outside activities like communal pet walks. Even walking around the block with a pet can result in finding new friends. Especially those who share common interests, like walking their own dogs!
  • Protection – Large dogs make great protectors, but can be too much for a senior to handle. But even a small dog can help protect a senior. As soon as a prowler hears barking on the other side of the door, he will think twice about intruding.

Seniors aren’t the only ones who benefit from this relationship. Rescue dogs can make the best pets for seniors. A saved life can save another’s life. And because most seniors are retired, they can devote a lot of their time to their pets.

If there is a senior in your life who can benefit from owning a pet, ask questions first. Do they want one? Can they handle the tasks that come with pet ownership? Does their living situation allow pets? Do they have the finances for supporting a pet?  Never surprise a senior with a pet. Do your homework first. It will prevent problems later. And it can also make for the best of relationships.

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Senior Care in Inverness, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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7 Tips for Protecting Seniors from Summer Heat

7 Tips for Protecting Seniors from Summer Heat

As temperatures rise, it’s more important than ever to stay hydrated. Dehydration diminishes one’s ability to regulate temperature, so there is a greater risk of developing a heat illness. Seniors are especially prone to this threat. In fact, a University of Chicago Medical Center study found that 40% of heat-related fatalities in the U.S. were among people over 65.

Why do seniors get dehydrated more easily? First, they are less able to notice changes in their body temperature. And since they don’t feel their body temperatures rise, they don’t feel the need to hydrate themselves. Also, many medicines that seniors take can contribute to dehydration, as can some health conditions, like heart disease, diabetes and obesity. Fortunately, there are simple precautions to take to keep seniors safe.

Here are seven tips for protecting seniors from summer heat:

  1. Drink fluids – Offer them plenty of liquids such as water or fruit juice. Avoid alcohol, caffeinated drinks and sodas high in sodium. If the senior doesn’t want to drink fluids, try to get them to eat popsicles or watermelon.
  2. Dress appropriately – Seniors, especially those with Alzheimer’s, don’t always dress for the season. Make sure your loved ones are wearing lightweight, loose clothing. And have them wear a wide-brimmed, loosely woven hat if going outside.
  3. Keep cool – Keep seniors indoors if they have central air. If they want to go outside, choose the early morning or mid-evening hours when it’s cooler. Don’t keep the air conditioning set too high, though, so they don’t layer on the clothes, then wander outside overdressed.
  4. Seek air conditioning – If seniors don’t have central air, keep draperies and blinds closed to block out the sun, and consider renting a window unit for one room where they can cool off.
  5. Monitor the signs – Watch for signs of heat stroke in your loved ones. Dizziness, nausea, headache, rapid heartbeat, chest pain, fainting and breathing problems are all warning signs of dehydration and heat stroke. If any of these signs appear, contact a physician immediately.
  6. Rest – Avoid excessive exercise and strenuous activity during heat spells. Keep walks short and exercise sessions brief.
  7. Rinse off – Have the senior take a cool shower, bath, or washcloth wipe-down if they don’t have central air. Keep the water just below body temperature for maximum effect.

If you know any seniors who live alone, check on them daily, preferably in person. If you can’t visit them in person, ask a neighbor or the local police department to perform a wellness check.

Sources: Dailycaring.com, Agingcare.com

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Home Care Services in Lake Zurich, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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Estate Planning for Seniors – A Necessary Plan of Action

Estate Planning for Seniors – A Necessary Plan of Action

An estate consists of everything someone owns, like bank accounts, their home and their car, and the debts they owe, like a mortgage. An estate plan, simply put, is the process of anticipating and arranging, during their life, for the management and disposal of their estate during their life and after death. While everyone should have an estate plan, for seniors it is a necessity. Without an estate plan, adult children must file a court action to obtain authority over their parent if they are incapacitated. In order to avoid this expense and process, certain documents should be created as part of one’s estate plan.

The main components of an estate plan consist of the following documents:

  1. Heath Care Power of Attorney – This document is in effect while the senior is still alive. It gives someone else, usually a family member, the authority to make health care decisions on behalf of the senior should the senior become incapacitated an unable to make their own health care decisions.
  2. Durable Power of Attorney – This document allows a specific person named in the power of attorney to act on the senior’s behalf to manage legal and financial affairs when their loved one no longer can. Power can be designated to be very broad to allow complete control, or limited to a specific task.
  3. Will – This document sets forth all of the essential details of who will inherit property, when and how they will inherit it, and who will be put in charge of settling final affairs. The person named as executor of the will should have a copy of it and know where the original is located.
  4. Trust – This document places assets into a trust for the senior’s benefit while they are alive and then transfers remaining assets to designated beneficiaries after they pass away. Trusts are overseen by the trustees, who are named by the senior in the document.

It is important that these documents be created with an attorney’s assistance while the senior is still of legal capacity. The senior must be able to discuss and understand the contents of the documents, and the consequences of their decisions.

All these documents must be written and witnessed in order to be valid and carried out. Requirements vary by state as to the exact content and required number of witnesses. A lawyer in the senior’s state of residence can provide these guidelines.

Why Is Estate Planning Important?

If a senior passes away without a will or trust, the government can decide what happens to one’s possessions, property and money. And it may not be what the senior would have wished.

  • It lets the senior choose which family members receive property.
  • It ensures that after death, any property transfers occur smoothly.
  • It minimizes the amount of taxes that will have to be paid on property transfers.
  • It sets forth all the funeral arrangements.
  • It ensures that any business held by the senior keeps operating without interruption.

An estate plan gives the senior and their families peace of mind.

Sources: Nolo.com, SeniorsandHealth.com

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Home Care Services in Arlington Heights, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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Seven Fall Prevention Tips for Seniors

Seven Fall Prevention Tips for Seniors

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, falls are the leading cause of both fatal and nonfatal injuries for people over 65. They can result in fractures, broken bones and head injuries. In fact, one in four older Americans fall every year. And once they fall, they fear it will happen again, which can prevent them from participating in activities they enjoy.

The good news is that most falls can be prevented. But first, let’s look at some common factors that can lead to falls in seniors:

  • Balance – As we age, we lose coordination. Inactivity can also cause imbalance and gait problems.
  • Medications – Both prescription and over the counter medications can cause dizziness, which puts a senior off balance. Sometimes it is a result of medications interacting with each other.
  • Vision – Less light reaches the retina as we age. It becomes more difficult to see tripping hazards and other obstacles.
  • Physical Conditions – Some diseases such as diabetes and high blood pressure can cause dizziness, which leads to falls.
  • Clutter – Many seniors have been in their family home for years, and are surrounded by furniture and belongings they don’t want to part with. These items can cause falls if pathways aren’t clear.

Identifying the cause(s) of falls can help you come up with solutions.  Here are seven fall prevention tips for seniors.

  1. Remove tripping hazards – This includes throw rugs, extension cords, small pieces of furniture, and yes, even pets. Transitions between rooms should be smooth also.
  2. Monitor medications – Discuss your loved one’s current medications, both prescription and over-the-counter, with their physician. There may be side effects or interactions that can be prevented by changing their dosage or medication.
  3. Improve lighting – Are rooms well-lit? If the senior can’t see well, brighter lights can help illuminate their surroundings. Install additional fixtures if necessary.
  4. Install grab bars – Make the bathroom safer with grab bars in the shower and near the toilet. Towel bars are not meant to withhold the weight of a person’s grasp, and can easily be ripped from the wall.
  5. Check their clothing – Do shoes fit well? Are slippers too smooth on the carpet? Are garments too loose that they might catch on doorknobs or handles? Do belts/wraps hang too low or catch on furniture?
  6. Live on one level – If they don’t live in a ranch home, can they confine their living space to one level, and thereby avoid stairs?
  7. Clear the clutter – Remove piles of newspapers, extra furniture, etc., from floors. Keep surfaces clean to avoid sleeves catching on tabletop clutter. Remove furniture with sharp corners.

You can’t be with your elderly parents 24 hours/day. Taking these steps will keep them safer when you are away. Hiring a trusted caregiver will also give you peace of mind.

Source: NCOA.org

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Home Care Services in Park Ridge IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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Five Common Scams Against Seniors and How to Recognize Them

Five Common Scams Against Seniors and How to Recognize Them

One of the fastest growing crimes against older Americans is financial scams. One financial firm estimates seniors lose as much as $36.5 million a year. And that may be grossly underestimated, as seniors are often too embarrassed to report the theft.

Financial scammers target seniors because they are believed to have a significant amount of savings. Yet even low-income adults are at risk of abuse. And it’s not always strangers who perpetrate these crimes. Over 90% of all reported elder abuse is committed by an older person’s own family members.

Here are five of the most common financial scams against seniors.

  1. Telemarketing fraud. Seniors are comfortable placing orders on the phone and often welcome the company of talking to others. They think nothing of giving someone their credit card or bank account information because they’ve done it before. Once the scammers have this info, they will keep withdrawing funds until the accounts are empty.
  2. Pigeon Drop. This is another form of telemarketing fraud. Someone calls offering to split a large amount of money if the senior makes a “good faith” deposit into the scammer’s bank account. Similar to the pigeon drop is the Sweepstakes scam. The caller tells the senior they’ve won a large amount of money, but must pay the taxes before the prize can be claimed.
  3. The grandparent scheme. In this scam, the caller pretends to be a grandchild who is in trouble. They ask for money to be wired to them, but not to let his/her parents know. They want to keep it a secret. Having a soft spot for their grandchildren, they easily comply.
  4. Fake charities. Most people are sympathetic to children or animals in need. In this scam, the caller claims to be collecting donations on behalf of sick children or some other unfortunate victims. They ask for donations to the charity, which happens to be fake. Scammers run off with the money, and the senior feels useful.
  5. Medicare scam. Since most seniors are on Medicare, it’s easy for scammers to use this as a ploy. They call to confirm personal information, then use it to steal their identity. Or they use the information to send bogus billing invoices to Medicare through fake clinics.

Unfortunately, scams don’t always end with the initial call. Once one scammer is able to steal money from the senior, they not only call again, but sell the contact info to other scammers. The crimes are sometimes serious enough that the senior’s accounts are completely drained, leaving them penniless.

When a senior lives alone, it’s difficult to monitor their every move. If you know or care for an older adult, here are some warning signs that may indicate they are the victim of financial abuse:

  • There are piles of sweepstakes mailings, free gifts and random magazines in their mail.
  • Bills aren’t being paid.
  • There are unusual changes in their bank accounts, such as withdrawals or ATM transactions.

If you suspect your loved one is a victim of fraud, call the Eldercare Locator at 1-800-677-1116 or visit their web site at https://eldercare.acl.gov to find the contact info for your local Adult Protective Services.

Source: NCOA.org

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Home Care Services in Des Plaines, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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Tips for Senior Gardeners

Tips for Senior Gardeners

 

If you are a family caregiver for an elderly adult that enjoys gardening, you should be pleased that they have a fun hobby that keeps them active and outdoors. Gardening can also reduce stress and boost self-esteem in seniors, plus it gives them a sense of purpose and accomplishment. Of course, the benefit of fresh fruit, vegetables, and flowers is appealing as well. There’s no doubt that gardening is an ideal hobby for elderly adults.

Usually, family caregivers don’t think of gardening as dangerous or unsafe, but when it comes to elderly adults, there are a few things about gardening that can cause them some harm. Because of physical challenges, many seniors need to make modifications to their garden and their gardening habits as they age. When you and your elderly loved one follow these safety and health tips for senior gardeners, they’ll be able to enjoy their hobby for years to come.

Here are some tips for senior gardeners that family caregivers and elderly care providers should implement to keep them happy and healthy:

  • Build raised beds that let elderly gardeners plant, weed and harvest without bending, stooping or kneeling.
  • Set up a container garden in a variety of large pots and baskets set on their porch and patio for seniors in wheelchairs and walkers.
  • Purchase garden tools with large grips and thick foam handles so senior gardeners with arthritis can maintain a firm grip.
  • Provide a garden stool or bench so the elderly person can remain comfortable and stable as they work.
  • Ask elderly care providers to put sunscreen on the elderly gardener, plus lightweight long sleeves, sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat to prevent sunburn.
  • Keep several pairs of gardening gloves around to protect the elderly person’s hands and thinning skin from cuts and scrapes.
  • Instruct elderly care providers to keep the aging adult hydrated as they garden so they don’t suffer from heatstroke.
  • Allow the senior gardener to be outside in the early morning or late afternoon to avoid the worst of the UV rays and hot temperatures.
  • Scale back the size of the garden to best fit the elderly adult’s abilities and needs. Too much garden can be overwhelming and frustrating.
  • Let elderly care providers do the heavy lifting of pots, equipment and more so the elderly gardener doesn’t overexert themselves.
  • Keep a watchful eye out for uneven paths and other obstacles that could cause a slip and fall accident.

 

When it comes to gardening, seniors can do as much as they want when they and family caregivers implement a few modifications. Over time, it may be more necessary to scale back the size and scope of the garden to fit into their ability. It’s in an elderly gardener’s best interest to keep going as long as they want to because gardening is good for both the body and the mind.

 

If you or an aging loved-one are considering Senior Care in Inverness, IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

Source:
Totallandscapecare.com

 

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