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Why Is Communicating with Other Family Members So Difficult Sometimes?

Why Is Communicating with Other Family Members So Difficult Sometimes?

The Holiday Season Brings Families Together, But Sometimes It’s Still Hard to Communicate!

Home Care in Barrington IL: The Holiday Season Brings Families Together, But Sometimes It's Still Hard to Communicate!

Home Care in Barrington IL: The Holiday Season Brings Families Together, But Sometimes It’s Still Hard to Communicate!

Family dynamics are exceedingly complicated and create undercurrents that affect everyone. As a family caregiver, you might find that communicating with some of your other family members feels way more difficult than it should be. You might find this to be true at family gatherings or simply when you call to ask for a little bit of help.

Old Tapes Play

Other family members may know you in a different scenario altogether and not as someone who is in charge of everything. This can warp their view of the current situation and make discussing what’s going on now extremely difficult. The best that you can hope for is to show them that you’re handling the situation the best that you can and that they can help or stand aside.

They Don’t See the Full Picture

You’re there all the time with your elderly family member because you’re the primary caregiver. Other family members, however, may only see a small snapshot of what goes on. This can mean that when you bring up the fact that you need help in the form of senior care providers, for example, they can accuse you of exaggerating. Without the knowledge that you have of the situation, they’re not able to come to the same conclusions.

They’re Experiencing Guilt

When someone isn’t doing all that they can or all that they want to do in a particular situation, that guilt can express itself in excessive criticism, angry comments, or just a generally negative attitude. This is difficult for you to deal with, but it’s not your problem.

They Just Don’t Get It

Some family members, no matter how much you educate them or attempt to bring them in, are never going to get it. They’re never going to understand your senior’s needs, what you do, or what caregiving entails. This is incredibly frustrating, but like the guilt, it’s not something that you can fix because you’re not causing the problem.

You may not be able to solve any or all of these concerns and you have to let that go. Unfortunately, how other people feel and react isn’t something that you can fix.

Home Care Can Help!

Sometimes taking a break (even if it’s only for a few hours) can really help clear the mind. Enlisting the help of a home care agency and their professional staff can help not only with giving the family caregiver a break but also with tips and hints on how to reach out to other family members. After all, your local home care professionals are experts in senior care issues, including communication challenges. Give it a try, you might just need a little rest and time for reflection.

If you or an aging loved-one are considering home care in Barrington IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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What Kinds of Changes Might You See in Alzheimer’s Disease?

What Kinds of Changes Might You See in Alzheimer’s Disease?

So many things change for your entire family when a loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Many of these changes affect how your senior is able to communicate and think through the different aspects of her life that were always so easy before she developed Alzheimer’s disease.

Senior Care Barrington IL: Alzheimer's disease means that your elderly family member is going to experience a lot of different changes in how she thinks and communicates. Here are just some of those possible changes.

Senior Care Barrington IL: Alzheimer’s disease means that your elderly family member is going to experience a lot of different changes in how she thinks and communicates.

Your Senior Might Have Trouble Communicating

As your elderly family member’s brain changes, the way she communicates also changes. It might be more difficult for her to find words when she’s speaking to you or writing. She may also find that she loses her train of thought while she’s in the middle of talking to someone. This can be extremely disconcerting, especially if she’s never experienced this kind of trouble before.

Her Attention Span Might Be Much Shorter

In the past, your senior may have been able to follow long conversations, complicated movies, or the plot of her favorite book. Alzheimer’s disease can alter her attention span, however, and leave her feeling lost when she loses track of what is going on.

Step-by-step Tasks Are Way More Complicated

It’s amazing how many normal, daily tasks are actually made up of smaller steps that people follow without having to think much about them. Unfortunately, Alzheimer’s disease makes it more difficult for your senior to follow those steps easily. She may forget how to get dressed or how to make a favorite dish. You, family members, and home care providers can all help by prompting her with the next step or helping her follow a checklist.

She Might Feel Frustrated More Often

Keep in mind that these changes may make your senior feel much more frustrated than she ever has been in the past. She’s experiencing big changes that she can’t control. It’s especially difficult when communicating with you and other people she cares about becomes unpredictable. Practice patience as much as you can and remind your elderly family member that you’re there for her.

There are plenty of other changes that you and other family members might notice in your aging adult if she’s developed Alzheimer’s disease. Work with her doctor to understand the changes and what you can do to help her as much as possible.

If you or an aging loved-one are considering senior care in Barrington IL, please contact the caring staff at Inspired Care Home Health today. Call and talk to our friendly caring staff at 847-787-7572.

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Cold and Flu Care Tips for Seniors

Trees are changing, there’s a nip in the air. Winter is just around the corner, and so is cold and flu season. For most of us, it’s an inconvenience. For the elderly, coming down with the flu can have serious consequences. Their immune systems aren’t as strong as they used to be, so they are more susceptible and affected more severely. Adults aged 65 and older have an increased risk of developing complications, being hospitalized, or dying from influenza.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it is estimated that 71%-85% of cold and flu-related deaths in recent years have occurred in people over the age of 65. The agency also states that approximately 54%-70% of related hospitalizations occurred in the same age range.

Therefore, it is important to protect seniors from contracting the flu. How can you help?

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Veterans Aid & Attendance Benefit – Do You Qualify?

Did you know that if you are a Veteran (or a surviving spouse), you may be eligible for Aid & Attendance Benefit? If you have never heard of it, you are not alone. The VA estimates that there are currently over 2 million Veterans who could qualify for this benefit, yet only 25% of them may be taking advantage of it.

The VA Aid & Attendance benefit could provide up to 80 hours/month of FREE HOME CARE to help Veterans (and/or their surviving spouse) with Activities of Daily Living (ADL) in their own homes, assisted living or nursing homes.

How do you know if you qualify?

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Conversing with an Alzheimer’s Patient

CaregiverHave you ever felt frustrated communicating with a friend or family member who has Alzheimer’s? Well…you are not alone. One common symptom of Alzheimer’s Disease is the increasing difficulty to communicate with others. It starts with the inability to find the right words and as the disease progresses, the person with Alzheimer’s may have difficulty making logical sense and sometimes may revert to a native language. At advanced stages of Alzheimer’s, the person often speaks less and sometimes relies primarily on gestures to communicate.

Therefore, it is extremely important to know how to better communicate with the person suffering from Alzheimer’s during the various stages of the disease.

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Recognizing the Signs of Dementia

When you hear the word ‘Dementia’, you might associate it with memory loss.  Yet the disease is much more than that.  Dementia is defined by the Gale Dictionary of Medicine as “…a loss of mental ability severe enough to interfere with normal activities of daily living, lasting more than six months, not present since birth, and not associated with a loss or alteration of consciousness.”

Mental ability declines naturally with age but when memory impairment starts to interfere with at least two activities of daily living (such as Bathing, Dressing, Toileting, Eating or Continence), it is considered dementia.

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Distinguishing Different Types of Dementia

Dementia is defined as “a decline in mental ability severe enough to interfere with daily life.”  Dementia isn’t a disease in itself, but rather a term used to describe a wide variety of symptoms associated with memory impairment and thinking ability.

Symptoms of dementia can vary greatly, but at least two of the following must be significantly impaired to be considered dementia:

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Dementia Caregiving During the Holidays

Holidays evoke images of family traditions and celebrations with friends. But for those of you living with family members who suffer from Alzheimer’s and other dementia, the holidays can be challenging. While it is important that you pay attention to these needs, it is just as important to take care of yourself, enjoy the holidays and add some beautiful memories with your loved ones.

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Seven Creative Ways to Pay for In-Home Care

Non-medical home care is an ideal solution for many families as their parents age.  However, the challenge often arises of how to pay for that care.  While some seniors may have funds to pay for home care, a lot of seniors struggle to pay for their care at home without any government assistance.

This article addresses some payment options for non-medical home care. This list is not all-inclusive and you can come up with your own creative ways to pay for care at home.

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Ten Fun Activities for Seniors

We can’t know for certain what will happen to each of us.  But what we do know is that stimulating the brain and the body are both advantageous and necessary for all of us. Keeping minds sharp, bodies strong and spirits high benefits our overall well-being.

This is especially important for seniors in the early stages of dementia.  Studies have shown that actively using their brain helps keep them alert and oriented much longer.  Thus, they will be less likely to simply sleep or watch television all day and lose memory or mental abilities.

Here are some fun activities you can enjoy with the seniors without tiring them out :) .

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